Experimental Decision-Making Model

Last night, I had an idea for a decision-making process which considers the emotional weight of each pro and con, and can be tailored to each individual.1. Think of the best and worst things that have ever happened to you.2. Assign a numeric value—above zero—to the best thing. That number will represent the highest value on your scale, and the happiest you’ve ever been. Call it your best-case scenario reference point. As an example, achieving a lifelong dream might be a fifty, but you should substitute your own significant event. 3. Assign a negative value—below zero—to the worst thing. That will represent the lowest value in your scale, and the most unhappy you’ve ever been. Call it your worst-case-scenario reference point. As an example, losing a pet, friend, or family member might be a fifty, but you should substitute your own significant event. 4. Zero is reserved for the most neutral scenario, representing an average day where nothing eventful (good or bad) happens. Basically this is the kind of day you get through on autopilot.5. Compile a list of positive and negative consequences of your decision.6. Assign each positive consequence a value between zero and your best-case-scenario reference point number. This represents how happy you feel these outcomes would make you, relative to the happiest you’ve ever been.7. Assign each negative consequence a value between zero and your worst-case-scenario reference point number. This number should be a negative, and represents how unhappy you feel these outcomes would make you, relative to the most unhappy you’ve ever been.8. Total the values of your positive consequences. This number is your positive total.9. Total the values of your negative consequences. This number should be a negative. For example, if you had two negative consequences on your list valued at -10 and -15, your negative total would be -25.10. Subtract your negative consequence total from your positive consequence total. For example, if your positive total is 35, and your negative total is -25, subtract 25 from 35. In this case, your answer would be 15. As this is a positive value, it would represent a positive outcome. A negative value would represent a negative outcome. A value of zero would represent a neutral outcome.*There are two notable biases when using this system: one being that values of possible outcomes are naturally assigned based on perception rather than actuality (this bias is present within all methods of decision-making), and the other that assigning grossly uneven best/worst-case-scenario values (as an example, -25 and 100, or -50 and 10) could skew results.*It’s important to note that this system is only intended to give an idea as to the best decision you should make. I plan to experiment with it, and you’re more than welcome to as well, but I won’t accept liability for the outcome of anyone’s decisions but my own.It’s dumb to have to put a disclaimer on a decision model, but the last thing I need is people blaming me for undesirable results of their own decisions.No. Just no.I came up with this (if someone else has, I’m not aware) to make the decision-making process easier on myself. Standard “pros & cons” don’t absolve my anxieties and don’t make the process easier or faster. They should, and I’ve been told that countless times, but they don’t, so why waste time and energy?I’m autistic, so making important decisions is more difficult than many realize. There’s a lot of internal process stuff involved that most neurotypicals, and even higher-functioning people on the spectrum take for granted.~Niki

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